Q
Eli. Eli Sohl. Make more. And then give me the candy.
Anonymous
A

silly anonymous, I can’t give you the candy if I don’t know who you are


Multiples of consecutive numbers! The columns represent integers, and the rows count off on these columns by 2s, 3s, 4s, etc. All sorts of interesting patterns emerge from this! For example, columns with exactly one skittle in them are primes, skittle-rich columns show up a lot in musical harmonics, and diagonal lines which look like these show up in all sorts of places.

Multiples of consecutive numbers! The columns represent integers, and the rows count off on these columns by 2s, 3s, 4s, etc. All sorts of interesting patterns emerge from this! For example, columns with exactly one skittle in them are primes, skittle-rich columns show up a lot in musical harmonics, and diagonal lines which look like these show up in all sorts of places.


Part two! This is an illustration of a neat fact that I noticed a few days ago. Made with mint patties and licorice. I’m worried that the illustration is a bit opaque, so clarification is below. Just in case.

—Spoiler alert—

Essentially, what I tried to illustrate is this: If you count in binary, starting at 0, (the left column) and at each step tally up the 1s in your number, you get a second sequence: 0, 1, 1, 2, 1, 2, 2, 3, 1, 2, 2, … (the right column). The gif above shows a cool property of this second sequence — to be specific, if you remove every other element, the overall sequence remains unchanged.


Counting in binary with mint patties! Wrapped = 1, unwrapped = 0. This isn’t the most original post — I did a similar thing with gummy bears a while back — but I thought it’ll provide a good introduction for my next post, which might otherwise seem kind of opaque.

Counting in binary with mint patties! Wrapped = 1, unwrapped = 0. This isn’t the most original post — I did a similar thing with gummy bears a while back — but I thought it’ll provide a good introduction for my next post, which might otherwise seem kind of opaque.


Parabola!

This picture represents a typical definition of a parabola: the set of points which are the same distance from a fixed point and a fixed line. Getting the straws right on this one was really difficult, but I’m really happy with the result.

Parabola!

This picture represents a typical definition of a parabola: the set of points which are the same distance from a fixed point and a fixed line. Getting the straws right on this one was really difficult, but I’m really happy with the result.


Q
I'm really digging this concept. Math + candy = awesome. Will you be updating anymore?
A

Thanks! I’ll definitely keep updating. Infrequently, perhaps — it takes a lot of candy to make these, and the half-life of candy in my house is fairly short — but I don’t plan on stopping any time soon.


Frequency count of colors in a random sampling of skittles! Note how they’re arranged by descending electromagnetic frequency. I like doing these for various candies — it gives an unusual insight into the marketing side of things. It’s interesting here to note how red is the only outlier in this set. I have a few interesting explanatory hypotheses, but best-guess is that red is just the flavor which people like most. As an aside, this picture was taken in the same cafe where the MathCandy concept started.

Frequency count of colors in a random sampling of skittles! Note how they’re arranged by descending electromagnetic frequency. I like doing these for various candies — it gives an unusual insight into the marketing side of things. It’s interesting here to note how red is the only outlier in this set. I have a few interesting explanatory hypotheses, but best-guess is that red is just the flavor which people like most. As an aside, this picture was taken in the same cafe where the MathCandy concept started.


This is Bhaskara’s classic first proof of the Pythagorean Theorem, with dramatic lighting added! I usually use natural light, but due to time constraints I had to get creative here. 
Second picture

This is Bhaskara’s classic first proof of the Pythagorean Theorem, with dramatic lighting added! I usually use natural light, but due to time constraints I had to get creative here. 

Second picture


Buffon’s Needle with Rips licorice, Airheads Xtreme and snow! Buffon’s Needle is an interesting problem in geometric probability. Essentially, it asks for the probability that a needle randomly dropped onto a plane of parallel lines will intersect one of the lines.
All of the solutions I know require some calculus, but the solution is really neat—proofs are detailed in the linked article. It turns out that if each line is a needle-length apart, then the probability of the needle intersecting a line ends up being 2/Pi, or roughly 0.6366.

Buffon’s Needle with Rips licorice, Airheads Xtreme and snow! Buffon’s Needle is an interesting problem in geometric probability. Essentially, it asks for the probability that a needle randomly dropped onto a plane of parallel lines will intersect one of the lines.

All of the solutions I know require some calculus, but the solution is really neat—proofs are detailed in the linked article. It turns out that if each line is a needle-length apart, then the probability of the needle intersecting a line ends up being 2/Pi, or roughly 0.6366.


This is an approximation of the Mandelbrot Set using an assortment of brown candies! The hardest part about making this one (and perhaps the reason why it doesn’t have a greater level of detail) was resisting the urge to devour it.
This was a collaboration with the fantastic haiku2! She came up with the concept, helped pick out the supplies and in general did a lot more of the work than I’d like to admit.

This is an approximation of the Mandelbrot Set using an assortment of brown candies! The hardest part about making this one (and perhaps the reason why it doesn’t have a greater level of detail) was resisting the urge to devour it.

This was a collaboration with the fantastic haiku2! She came up with the concept, helped pick out the supplies and in general did a lot more of the work than I’d like to admit.